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Intensive MSH

See what happens when every second counts. As part of the celebrations to mark the 10th anniversary of MSH Medical School Hamburg, we are making it possible for you to experience the operation of a fully functional intensive care unit for 30 hours straight on 11th and 12th October 2019.

You will gain exclusive insights into the responsible daily routine of doctors, emergency paramedics and nursing staff. Experience the perfect interaction of all professional groups in the admission, care and discharge of different patients. The various emergency scenarios will be supported by impulse lectures on all aspects of emergency and intensive care and illustrated, among other things, with a simulated ambulance. In addition, you have the chance to become active yourself and practice how to keep a clear head in an emergency with our resuscitation training.

Lectures Friday, October 11, 2019

Lectures Friday, October 11, 2019

1:30 pm »Intensive Care: What's going on?«

Hubert Biniak, health and specialist nurse for intensive medicine and anaesthesia at the University Hospital Hamburg Eppendorf and part-time student in the bachelor's programme in medical education.

Treatment behind milk glass doors, protective clothing, intimidating equipment and strange noises: The intensive care unit is anything but an everyday work area. In this lecture it is to be made understandable, what is actually carried out on intensive care units, which technology is used and which medical challenges are mastered there.

 

2:30 pm »Reanimation by laypersons: Why is it so important?«

Barbara Jackisch, Coordination German Reanimation Register

Anyone who suffers cardiac arrest is in acute danger of death. Now it's a matter of seconds: In order to avert imminent death and prevent serious organ damage, first-aiders must begin with the decisive measures before the rescue service arrives. This lecture will illustrate how resuscitation works and what needs to be observed.

 

3:30 pm »Patient directive: Why do we need this?«

Henrike Weber, staff member in outpatient intensive care and graduate of the Bachelor's programme in medical pedagogy

This lecture will show why living wills are so important and in which situations they can be of enormous importance. However, it will also be explained why living wills must have a certain form if they are actually to be taken into account.

 

4:30 pm »Brain death diagnostics: How does it work?«

Prof. Dr. med. Oliver Heese, Clinic Chief Physician for Neurosurgery and Spinal Surgery, Head of the Oncology Centre at Helios Kliniken Schwerin

There are different types of death detection. In certain situations, the functions of the human brain may be irreparably lost and organ donation may be considered. In his lecture, Prof. Dr. med. Heese will explain how »brain death« is determined in a medically correct manner and which complicated processes are adhered to.

 

5:30 pm »Crisis intervention: Psychosocial child aid after catastrophes«

Prof. Dr. Harald Karutz, Professor of Rescue Management at MSH

The extent to which crisis intervention actually helps children who have experienced a major disaster has so far not been adequately researched. At the same time, however, after bus accidents, rampages, fires and acts of terrorism, children are particularly at risk of developing psychological emergency consequences such as post-traumatic stress disorder. The Federal Office for Civil Protection and Disaster Assistance in Bonn has therefore commissioned a research project to investigate and further develop psychosocial emergency care for children and young people. The lecture will give you an overview of this interesting research project.

Lectures on Saturday, October 12, 2019

Lectures on Saturday, October 12, 2019

10:30 am »The changing world: new dangers and risks«

Stephan Bandlow, Head of Department of the Cooperative Regional Control Centre West and part-time student in the Bachelor's programme Rescue Management

Daniel Lauer, paramedic at Frankfurt am Main Airport and part-time student in the bachelor's program Rescue Management

The world is changing, and the emergence of new dangers and risks is associated with it. In this presentation, prospective rescue leaders will be shown which scenarios authorities and organizations tasked with security are preparing for and why it is important to deal very carefully with certain developments.

 

11:30 am »Physiotherapy in the intensive care unit?«

Franziska Bahl, studio manager at McFIT Global Group GmbH and part-time student in the bachelor's programme in medical pedagogy

Many people associate treatment in intensive care units primarily with medical technology and complicated equipment. Only a few people are aware of the fact that, for example, physiotherapeutic measures are sometimes started in intensive care units after operations and that this can be of great importance for rehabilitation. Against this background it is shown why physiotherapists also belong to the treatment team in an intensive care unit.

 

12:30 pm »A rescue plan for unfortunate situations«

Kai Lundt, Emergency Paramedic and Organisational Manager Rescue Service and part-time student in the Bachelor's programme in Medical Education

A train or a plane crashes, there has been an explosion in which many people have been injured: We read about such events again and again in the media. How are rescue operations organized in such cases? How are priorities set and what operational tactics do the helpers follow? Answers to such and similar questions can be found in this lecture.

 

1:30 pm »Reanimation by laypersons: Why is it so important?«

Viktoria Preiss, health and nurse at the intensive care unit in the Land Rendsburg Clinic and part-time students in the bachelor's programme in medical education.

Anyone who suffers cardiac arrest is in acute danger of death. Now it's a matter of seconds: In order to avert imminent death and prevent serious organ damage, first-aiders must begin with the decisive measures before the rescue service arrives. This lecture will illustrate how resuscitation works and what needs to be observed.

 

2:30h »Organ donation: How does this work?«

Antje Winkler, Coordinator at the German Foundation for Organ Transplantation Region North

The current discussion about new legal regulations on organ removal shows how little knowledge is available in the population - organ donation is an emotionally charged issue. With facts and background information, this lecture will therefore contribute to objectification and explain in which steps organ donation takes place and which medical and ethical aspects are taken into account.

 

3:30h »My child is injured: When should I call the emergency services?«

Julia Dosch, emergency paramedic and part-time student in the bachelor's programme in medical pedagogy

While playing, it is not uncommon for a child to push or fall - blood, pain and lots of tears are the result. And the parents are insecure: Do I have to call the emergency services right away? Should I go to the paediatrician? What is right when? This lecture provides an overview of first aid measures for everyday life with children.

 

4:30 »Intensive transport: far more than just the journey from A to B«

Maik Rathje, Head of the Deployment and Rescue Services Department at the Johanniter-Unfall-Hilfe e.V. and part-time student in the bachelor program Rescue Management

Andreas Seidl, Rescue Assistant and Organizational Head of Operations at the Bavarian Red Cross and part-time student in the Rescue Management bachelor's programme

For some years now, intensive transport has been of particular importance. Patients are transferred from one hospital to another in order to receive the best possible treatment. Special intensive care trolleys are now available for this purpose, which can be referred to as rolling intensive care units and are not to be confused with regular ambulances. The crews of these vehicles also master special challenges. What the special features of intensive care transport are is impressively demonstrated in this lecture.

 

5:30 pm »What actually happens with my blood donation?«

Julia Graalmann, part-time student in the bachelor's programme in medical pedagogy

Anyone who has ever donated blood knows that the donated blood is collected in a bag to help seriously injured or acutely ill people later on. However, it is not quite as simple as that: Until a blood donation can be used for the treatment of a patient, numerous examination and preparation steps are necessary. This lecture explains in detail how modern transfusion medicine works.

Review Intensive MSH 2014

Students of medical education (MP11) at MSH Medical School Hamburg set up a lifelike intensive care unit under the motto »Intensive MSH« as early as 2014. The starting point was a project on »Interdisciplinary Teamwork«. The students showed how many medical disciplines are necessary in order to be able to optimally treat patients in an intensive care unit. Paramedics, health and nursing staff, physiotherapists, medical assistants, medical-technical assistants for laboratory medicine and radiology as well as geriatric nurses and midwives - all professions were represented in the study group.

  • German