Prof. Dr. habil. Lutz Wartberg

Prof. Dr. habil. Lutz Wartberg

Prof. Dr. habil. Lutz Wartberg
Professor for Health Psychology

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Biography

Professor Wartberg studied psychology with the elective subject neurology at the University of Hamburg and completed his diploma in psychology program with final grade »very good«. After completion of his studies, he undertook research assistant work in 2005 at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE) on the subject of problematic substance abuse in adolescence. In 2011 he successfully completed his doctoral studies with the result »magna cum laude« at the Department of Psychology of the University of Hamburg. Since 2011, he also examines the problematic use of the internet as well as computer games and social media and his publications of his cumulative habilitation centre around this field of research. In 2018 he was appointed Private Lecturer by the Medical Faculty of the University of Hamburg and was given the teaching license (»Venia legendi«) for the subject »Medical Psychology and Health Psychology«. In addition to his work at the UKE, he also worked at the University of Hamburg and at the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU). Since the summer semester 2018 he works as a professor of health psychology at the Faculty of Life Sciences of the MSH Medical School Hamburg.

Teaching

Prior to teaching in the bachelor's degree in psychology at the MSH Medical School Hamburg, Professor Wartberg gained experience with students of psychology and medicine. For several years he trained undergraduate and graduate students at the Department of Psychology of the University of Hamburg. At the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE) he delivered lectures for medical students.

Research focus

The primary research areas of Professor Wartberg are problematic use of computer games, social media and the internet as well as excessive alcohol consumption. He has also carried out research in the fields of psychological distress in adolescents (e.g., depressive symptoms), quality of life and familial aspects, as well as their relationship to problematic substance-bound and substance-unbounded behaviors.

Publications

 

 

  • German